Floods Test What To Value and For How Long to Value It!

posted by Jael Ever @ 16:30 PM
September 23, 2011

 Everyone from the United States Congress to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to some Pennsylvania residents are responsible for the astounding floods through which Tropical Storm Lee washed out homes and businesses in towns along the Susquehanna River a few weeks ago.  And all are without excuse:  The Susquehanna River Basic Commission insists that flooding along that river “causes tens of millions of damages each year.”

 Michael Rubinkam of the Associated Press writes:  “Congress’ failure to deliver on promised hazard-mitigation funding may wind up taking blame for some of the devastation.”  While Congress allocated $ 175 million to build dikes and flood-walls around Wilkes-Barre in 1972, it failed to appropriate all of the $ 23 million it authorized for flood mitigation projects intended to prevent harm to lower-lying, unprotected cities.

 In short, just by protecting some towns from floods, the government further endangered other communities sitting on the River’s edge.

 The other half of the story is that some residents in a few unprotected towns resisted building new levies because it  would restrict awesome views that could be seen from their historical antique-style mansions.  For instance, some 10 years ago, wealthier residents in the town of West Pittston, Pennsylvania, petitioned the Corp of Engineers not the build a $ 25 million dike there because it would obstruct the view from Victorian mansions along Susquehanna Avenue.  The town is known for the beauty of the riverfront when cherry blossom trees bloom along its rim.

 Now many in the city are furious, arguing that this refusal has brought their town of some 5,000 people to its knees:  250 homes are flooded out on the first or second floors, another 600 have flooded basements.  In addition, 26 businesses sustained millions of dollars in damages.

 Residents expressed fury at mansion-owners who had refused flood protection.   One affected homeowner says, “If it wasn’t for those hoity-toities on Susquehanna Avenue, we wouldn’t have this problem.”  Chris Economopolous, owner of a dry-cleaners, who lost hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of equipment to the flood added: “What do they want to look at?  There’s no view. This is one of the most polluted rivers in the country.”  After such extensive carnage and community complaints, all town residents, its mayor and City Council now ask the Army Corps to reconsider flood protection for West Pittston.

 There was a short saying in old time hymn books:  “Only One Life, t’will soon be passed.  Only what’s done for Christ will last.”  Maybe its time to print this on plus size Christian sweatshirts.  Followers of The Lord Jesus Christ should revalue potential lost of earthly things and put greater emphasis on that which is eternal––the Only and Everlasting Will and Person of Almighty God!

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