Lies, Stink & ‘Don’t Tell’ Rules: Exxon Up to Its Old Tricks!

posted by Sarah N Worthy IATTWJ Member @ 10:47 AM
April 15, 2013

oil spillWe usually don’t cover stories that get full press exposure unless coverage would give readers warnings about future events. But Exxon’s outrageous behavior during its recent oil spill in Arkansas is one of those times that we sound warning!

First, Exxon has slammed the door shut on all outgoing information––including photography from flights overhead––and the Federal Aviation Administration threw a no-fly zone over the entire area of the oil flood.

But video-journalist Adam Randall managed to shoot a five-minute long record of this broken pipeline before the new ‘laws’ were passed. He posted it on You Tube on April 2, three days after the flood broke. Later such flights were approved only if an Exxon employee is appointed flight coordinator.

About further suppression of news, Rachel Colyer of Daily Kos reports: “On the ground, reporters are being kept at a great distance from the actual site. Those who have tried to gain further access have been escorted away by security, threatened with arrest, and told to leave by local law enforcement.”

Second, however, the major press usually avoids explicitly telling the public that oil from this broken pipeline’s is very similar to the thick tar sands oil for which Canadian refineries want to build pipelines in the U.S. to bring tar-oil here.

Americans have no idea just how much oil is spilling down main streets of this Arkansas suburb. EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) says some 7,000 barrels of the slime have pumped out, but Exxon insists 3,000 is more accurate.oil-spilling-down-streets

Third, no matter how much oil is flowing from 70 year-old pipeline, its stench brings breathing problems to those residences still in the neighborhood. People remaining there––after 22 families in homes along the ruptured lines were evacuated to hotels––now complain of multiple illnesses coming from toxic air.

In ‘Arkansas Oil Spill Health Complaints Emerge In Mayflower,’ Lynne Peeples quotes April Lane, chair of a local school health and safety advisory group: “A lot of the released chemicals––benzene, hydrogen sulfide, toluene––are still extremely toxic, especially to children, the elderly and pregnant women, . . .” She says Exxon’s crude tests cannot detect harmful poisons in the air.

Fourth: Questions! Who gave Exxon the right to arrest American journalists in order to obstruct truth? When did Americans elect Exxon into office to decree acceptable levels of Americans’ health? And what does this suppression of truth have to do with the Keystone XL pipeline proposed to come down from Canada? Is the breaking pipe in Arkansas an omen for what Keystone would also bring?

Often called ‘the fourth estate,’ journalists have sworn duties as watchmen to warn nations of pending doom. As wholesale Christian Bibles insist, nations should ask journalists: “Watchman, what of the night? Watchman, what of the night? (Isaiah 21: 11)?” Journalists are among the few who can bring light to situations covered by man-made night!

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